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: and for most of this hour conversation with the foreign minister of pakistan hina rabbani khar. >> i think pakistan today presents a country which is very clear notice head how it operate with its neighbors and that is to try and build on the trust and then build that trust enough to be able to build an environment in i we can take care of the disputes we have on the dialogue table rather than through military statements and through military actions. >> rose: the president's last press conference of his first term, and the foreign minister of pakistan when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following:. captioning sponsored by rose communications >> from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: tonight we begin with news from the white house, president obama held the last press conference of his first term this morning. most focus was on the battle over the nation's debt limit. the president warned in his opening are remarks that the failure to raise the debt sealing would threaten the u.s. economy. >> so we got to pay our bills. and republicans in
.s. and pakistan on that is better coordination between also there appears to be a better clarity of u.s. positions relating to the very important questions. >> i have offered a few comments that have made mr. my experience. i do not have any association with them. texas on liked several others have made policy at stakes. pakistan has suffered but it is not all on the ground or in on the floor of many of their contributions to the region. i would also say they cannot place the blame for all of the problems on to others. the first point of a to make here, this is done talk about credit bet. not as much now. i have not met for several years while i was i in the form office any responsible person from anti civilian leadership who would be seeking to go to afghanistan or who would be considering the taliban as an asset for the future. i am not going to go into details of these as far as the taliban as concerned. there is no question of popular returning to get in why i did enter the mid 1990's. there are reasons for this. there are to be details. i was the before the moment. there is one thing it. paki
are important for the role of pakistan and many others. with that, let me turn to our three speakers, each of whom will speak for summer between six and ten minute roughly speaking and then we will open up to questions or dialogue with respect to the audience. we will start with jim, if you are ready, give you the floor. >> my response ability for afghanistan goes back to 2001 and is fair to say the time was present for creation of the current regime and i start by looking back and try to spot the things we did wrong at the time and it strikes me there were three fundamental errors two of which i perceive that the time and tried to do something about and one of which i failed to proceed entirely and did nothing about. one was the decision not to deploy any american or international peacekeepers in the country. we have a country with no police force and no army and we decided security would be an afghan responsibility after the fall of the taliban. i think that was a major mistake. the second was to allow the coalition we successfully built for the war and the peace conference disintegrate.
pakistan, with respect to the important issues regarding the region. we called the event "back to the future." some people have spoken before about this, and what we mean by that. i think we will let that emerged as the discussion goes on. we know we have a lot of fundamental issues to talk about. certainly, military presence has been an issue talked about in the newspapers all lot. governance is an important issue. technical issues, such as what type of agreements might be signed between the u.s. and afghanistan, are important. the role of pakistan. many others. with that, let me turn to our three speakers, each of whom will speak for six to 10 minutes, roughly speaking. then we'll open it up to dialogue, with the audience. i will give you the floor. >> my responsibilities for afghanistan go back to 2001. it is fair to say i was present at the creation of at least the current regime in kabul. i started by looking back and trying to spot the things we did wrong. it strikes me that there were three fundamental errors, two of which are perceived at the time and tried to do someth
to pakistan's foreign minister. according to one international ranking, pakistan ranks as the 34th most corrupt country in the world. it is not surprising that people are protesting. >> corruption that is a challenge in pakistan, like in many other countries. we are doing whatever we can and we intend to do more. we think that is very different than the type of person you are talking about, the person that has absolutely no credentials. staying for the last six years or more in canada. they are challenging pakistan and the fears of 180 million people. challenging the system or we have paid the price to put that in place in pakistan. >> you are talking about the clerics that have called on people to protest. but we talked to you about relations between washington and islamabad. one of the sticking points have been u.s. drone strikes within pakistan. there have been seven droned strikes within the past few weeks. have you come to the conclusion that these drones strikes are useful for pakistan? >> absolutely not. the point has been made for the last many years that they would be productiv
. in november, pakistan released 18 of the taliban members by request. they are trying to transform the afghan taliban into a political force. a director from the atlantic council says releasing them may not help the pakistan any people in the long run. -- the pakistani people in the long run. >> there is a very real possibility of sanctuary, as well as militants that have been fighting with the taliban against the state of pakistan, so pakistan risks of not if the taliban comes back to power. that is something it certainly does not favor. it also does not favor that they have control of the border territory. >> now, the latest in our series, looking ahead to 2013. elections scheduled in may of next year in pakistan. it will be the first time the government has completed a full five-year term. and some issues are more basic. our reporter explains. >> the shelves are stocked, but there are few customers. one family has run this vegetables and fruit stand for over 25 years, but their business has been struggling in recent years. >> the customers are very worried. their monthly income is just not
afghanistan and pakistan. this is about an hour and a half. [inaudible conversations] >> well, good afternoon, everybody, and welcome. i'm steve coll, i'm the president of the new america foundation, and it's my pleasure to welcome you to this event briefly. and to introduce our subject which from our perspective involves the launch of a book that somebody will hold up for the audience since i don't have a copy. talibanistan. laugh -- [laughter] and i just wanted to say a few words about where this book came from and why the subject matter that you'll hear discussed today struck us as or worthy of what became really a couple of years of endeavor at new america led by peter bergen who will be your moderator through most of the program today. peter and katherine teedman, who unfortunately is not with us today, co-edited this book. it's a collection of scholarly and journalistic articles about the taliban and it environment in southern afghanistan and western pakistan. and it was born as an attempt at new america by a diverse group of researchers to try to get at some of the diversity of the tal
to the to union, the former ambassador and the former secretary of pakistan to be hosted by the atlantic council here in washington, this is about 90 minutes. >> we are delighted to have you all. we are delighted to have our distinguished guests. it's pretty rare i think that you get three extraordinary ambassadors sitting next to one another each of whom has tremendous familiarity with the subject. on the council itself has been working on these issues for quite a number of years. this is actually the fourth anniversary of the salvation center. some of you may remember a few years ago the council did a very substantial report with respect to afghanistan. the then head of the council and the national security adviser was involved with some of the people in the audience involved frigate and we followed up on some of that work continuously over the last several years could get this is the latest installment if you will. i think that we all know that we are at an inflection point with respect to afghanistan to read a lot of the important decisions coming. president karzai is here to meet with presi
? or is there a difference? different kind of mission. those who are in pakistan, particularly the safe havens that are in pakistan, what kind of policy will you have. thank you. >> the mission will be fundamentally different. just to repeat. our main reason, should we have troops in afghanistan post 2014 at the invitation of the afghan government will be to make sure that we are training, assisting and afghan security forces who have now taken the lead for and are responsible for security throughout afghanistan. and of interest to the united states, the very reason we went to afghanistan in the first place to make sure that al qaeda and its affiliates cannot launch an attack against the united states or other countries from afghan soil. we believe that we can achieve that mission in a way that's very different from the very active presence that we've had in afghanistan over the last 11 years. president karzai has emphasized the strains that u.s. troop presences in afghan villages for example have created. well, that's not going to be a strain that exists if there is a follow-up operation, bec
years by the taliban. we succeeded against that. there are executions and -- pakistan is going through a very difficult time. and other of events there, they are all a source of concern for us. i can speak with satisfaction, the suffering that we have had, our schools are safer in the past three years, the great majority of girls go to school in afghanistan do if in safety and security. we have not had any major incidents. and this concern for families and students would be less and less a matter to think of. thank you, sir. >> this will conclude the program. i have one important announcement before i thank our remarkable speaker. please do not leave your seat until you hear the voice in the wilderness that will dismiss us. and only the afghan delegation will depart until such moment. on behalf of all of us, you have given us allot to think about. a lot of inspiration. women are lucky to have your support and we look forward to a wonderful future for your country. thank you so much. [applause] >> friday's news conference with president obama and president karzai. also, president karzai
soon to tell, but this could be a long war. >> pakistan is no stranger to political turmoil, and today they were reunited after the supreme court ordered the arrest of the prime minister on charges of corruption. from islamabad, we report. >> morning in islamabad. the day began with chaos near parliament. police firing in the air, saying they were shot at first by anti- government protesters. they say this is a peaceful revolution, that the government must go. this rally is just one challenge facing pakistan's leaders. this afternoon, there was another. protesters were euphoric when news broke that the prime minister was to be arrested. the celebration has really begun here. the crowd has just heard the news that the supreme court has ordered the arrest of pakistan's prime minister. people believe the timing shows that things are moving their way. they believe it is a victory for them. protesters say this is just the beginning of the change. >> the whole system will be changed. tos is the first step, remove the prime minister. >> here is the prime minister of arriving at the supreme co
>> more than 100 people killed across pakistan in a string of shootings and bombings. good to have you with us. this is al jazeera in so hot. execution-style killings in the heart of paris this is al jazeera in doha. harding in for a president who has not been seen in weeks. thousandth -- partying for a president who has not been seen in weeks. pro-shaba's demonstrations. -- pro-chavez demonstrations. more than 100 people died in pakistan in a day of violence. in the capital of pakistan's province, more than 19 people killed in an explosion. of least 25 people died in the valley with a bomb exploded. these people gathered to see our religious leaders the. in karachi, nine people were shot dead in seven incidents. >> just a few of many of the victims and distraught relatives after one of the deadliest attacks in years. two bombs went off, starting a snooker club. police say the first explosion was set off by a suicide bomber. people rushed to the scene to help but were hit by a second blast. security officers, a journalist, and rescue workers were killed. >> as we got to the scene,
under indian law. reports from northwest pakistan say that a militant commander has been killed in a u.s. drawn strike. pakistani officials told the bbc that mullah nazir and at least five others were killed in the attack in south waziristan near the afghan border. we have our islamabad correspondent, aleem maqbool. >> he is one of the key figures within the taliban in northwest pakistan. he is a man who controls a large part of south waziristan, which is a taliban stronghold, particularly the area of wana and towards the afghan border. certainly, the americans will be very pleased that he is now gone. the problem in afghanistan is not -- is that they are not just fighting the taliban there, but the militants often escape across the border into pakistan. mullah nazir was somebody who not only provided safe haven within the south of waziristan, but also provided fighters and material support for the insurgency across the border in afghanistan. >> these drone attacks have been controversial, haven't they? how will the pakistan government be dealing with the u.s. strong strike -- the fact
steve as well about your deep knowledge of afghanistan and pakistan and the other bordering states. >> this is one that has taken a back burner. we are not that far removed from the election. the election was about by and large nothing more than the economy and which side could do it better. as a result almost every other issue gets pushed to the side, but we have, you know -- there are realtime tables in place in afghanistan about what we have pledged to do, what we will do. you talk about chuck hagel. what chuck hagel's role in all of that, if et wants to be secretary of defense. it's a complicated issue, and it's more complicated politically, andrea, simply because the american public -- this happened in iraq. it's clearly happening in afghanistan. the american public has tired of our involvement in these conflicts. this is not something new. this is something that has been long and coming. if you look at the history in polling at least of when that happens, public opinion almost never sort of sways back up to all of a sudden be supportive and think this was a battle worth fight
, thank you. >> brown: still to come on the "newshour": bombings in pakistan claim more than 100 lives; the new ability to pay mortgage lending rules; political uncertainty in venezuela and hollywood's take on the hunt for osama bin laden. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: vice president biden will send his recommendations to curb gun violence to president obama by tuesday. the vice president held another round of meetings on the topic in washington today. this time, including sporting groups as well as the powerful national rifle association and others. mr. biden said a consensus is emerging for tightening background checks and banning high-capacity ammunition magazines. >> there's got to be some common ground here to not solve every problem but diminish the probability that what we've seen in these mass shootings will occur and diminish the probability that our children are at risk in their schools. >> sreenivasan: late today, the n.r.a. issued a statement saying it was disappointed that the discussions focused mainly on what it called an
pakistan and india were at a nadir. coins and with 9/11 and the subsequent bond process, a pakistani base -- terrorist group had conducted a large- scale terrorist attack on the indian parliament. the countries were close to war. very close to war. the idea that they would collaborate in some joint venture in afghanistan was more difficult to conceive then that might be now. relations have to some degree improved. i do not think that india and pakistan between them would be able to substitute for the kind of assistance -- [indiscernible] for some time to come. to the extent the country's -- countries could agree on some form of joint collaboration, i would not oppose it. but neither would i look to it to shoulder much of the load in the short to medium term. >> from rote. -- front row. >> i write the mitchell reports and also councilmember. fassel -- i wanted to ask the ambassador about his observations about cost and risk. and to do that in the context of american domestic political setting, just to say that 2014 is not just another year. it is midterms. i wonder if there is a way, if yo
. >> pakistan in turmoil as the supreme court orders the prime minister's rest -- are rest. >> france's mali mission. >> and has disgraced cyclist lance armstrong finally owned up to cheating? we begin in pakistan where the supreme court has ordered the arrest of the prime minister and 16 others over corruption charges. >> this came after a mass protest in the capital added to pressure by the government. >> and aid to the government has accused the military of orchestrating the protests, and the order to arrest the prime minister. this political turmoil comes just months ahead of national elections. >> instead of millions, security officials say it is more like 25,000 protesters gathered in the parliaments in islamabad. there have been isolated clashes, and there was violence as demonstrators reached the heavily fortified area around the parliament building. gunshots were heard, but it was unclear if they were from protesters or police. he is so far unknown in pakistani politics and is demanding the government step down immediately and that a caretaker government be set up to ensure that ele
every day. >> reporter: just three months ago in pakistan, malala was near death, shot in the head by the taliban. they were angered by her campaign for women's education. >> if you can help us, please help. >> reporter: instead of killing her, they made this teenage girl a household name and inspired support for her cause around the world. in pakistan, malala's school is now under armed guards. i really want her to come home, says her friend. but the taliban says it would shoot her again. now her father, who runs a school in pakistan, has been given a job in the uk, promoting education so the family can stay here. at least for a while. nbc has followed this story from the beginning. >> we're told by a source close that malala and her family are enjoying finally being together again and she and her father are as committed to ever as their advocacy work, not just in pakistan but around the world. right now their priority is malala's full recovery. >> reporter: malala will undergo reconstructive surgery in a few weeks, facing her recovery with the same courage and determination that
. >> that explosion in pakistan's largest city killed at least six people. police say a motorcycle bomb exploded close to a political rally. more than a dozen people have been taken to hospital. also in pakistan, a group of teachers and workers have been killed in a drive-by shooting. the gunman attacked their bus killing six women and one man. all of them are pakistanis. a deal to cushion america's fall over the fiscal cliff has run into opposition in congress. republican members and house are now considering a bill that would avoid tax rises for most americans. john is live for us in washington. we understand there has been some movement there in capitol hill. >> with the asian stock markets due to open in about an hour, there has been a little bit of movement here. the house is trying to vote on a bill that was passed in the upper house of the senate in the early hours of new year's day which avoids the fiscal cliff. the house has a problem because many members of -- are unhappy with the deal. what is happening at the moment is that the speaker of the house of representatives, john boehner has basi
's influential board and has served as a senior advisor as recently as 2011 for afghanistan and pakistan. ladies and gentlemen, dean vali nasr. [cheers and applause] now, when you think of provocative conversation on the big foreign policy challenge of the day you have to think about our next debater. his program on cnn is seen in over 200 countries worldwide but he's anything but a talking head on tv. he writes a column for "the washington post" and is the edit or "time" magazine. please welcome back to the munk debate stage journalist fareed zakaria. [cheers and applause] now we're moments from getting our debate under way but before we hear opening statements, once again, i need this audience assist answer to make sure our debaters stay on time in terms of their opening and closing remark and we move forward as a debate together. so you will see this countdown clock, this clock appear. when it reaches zero applaud. this will let our debaters know that their time is over for their opening and closing statements. before we kick off the debate let's see how the 3,000 people gathered today voted
as a result of what's in the bill and what's not. >> brown: then, new killings in pakistan, we look at the uptick in violence against aid workers and women teachers with "washington post" foreign affairs reporter pam constable. >> woodruff: paul solman takes us inside a company that turns a profit by employing an unusual workforce. >> a massachusetts manufacturing firm founded in 1932 where the median age is 74 and rosa finnegan over there, is 100. >> brown: and ray suarez talks with journalist and author claudia kolker about what she calls "the immigrant advantage." >> i began to ask foreign-born people what i call the question: what's the smartest thing that people did in your home country that you want to hang on to while you're here and the rest of us ought to copy? >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from view
and significantly discordant situation in both afghanistan and across the border in pakistan. so i think you probably are going to see an unraveling gradually. i think there's only one afghan brigade that is capable of acting independently. these forces need air support intelligence, all of the kind of logistics and other support that is necessary to be effective. fighting forces, they're not going to have that, and so i am much less an optimist about this eventual outcome. but when you look at the middle east, look at what happened at iraq, look at what happened in syria, the united states no longer leading from behind waiting from behind, and then you look at the decisions concerning afghanistan, you can understand why people throughout the region believe the united states is withdrawing and that is not good for the region. >> schieffer: let me ask you this senator. we went to afghanistan in the beginning because we wanted them to deny al-qaeda a safe haven the terrorists who caused 9/11 and i think to some extent we probably have done that. but as long as they have a safe haven in pakist
. but for pakistan. it's the northern part of pakistan. waziristan, which is where the new homeland is of terrorist is who would attack the american homeland. i think what the objective would be is to have a small number of bases, small number of soldiers from which you could direct the trone attacks or special forces. remember, in the raid to kill bin laden, launching area was from afghanistan. and if we hadn't had afghanistan as the base from which we could launch, we'd have to do it by aircraft carrier or other means. it seems we should be infinitely more difficult. that is a strategic objective today. whether obama will be able to negotiate it, i don't know. but he did not succeed negotiating something similar in iraq. >> bret: the taliban is a big question about what happens after 2014. a lot of talk that we have had around this table over the years, 11 of them, has been about the taliban has a tempt calendar than we do. they operate in decades and centuries, while the u.s. has a different calendar here locally. today, karzai said there is a new effort underway to recognize tal taliban. >> we
": the targeting of pakistan aid workers; the value of seniors in the workforce and the "immigrant advantage." but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: wall street started the year with a bang, as the fiscal cliff deal put an end to fears of sweeping tax hikes and spending cuts. the dow jones industrial average surged 308 points to close at 13,412-- its biggest gain in a year. the nasdaq rose more than 92 points to close at 3,112. the civil war in syria yielded grim new numbers today. the u.n. human rights office reported the number of dead has risen sharply over previous figures. we have a report narrated by alex thomson of "independent television news." some of the images may be disturbing. >> truly shocking. the words of the u.n. officials. syrians need no persuading of that. today, at least another 30 or so added to the death list. somebody fired into the petrol station. they'd have none here for four days. news was spreading fast that respliefs happening and the place was crowded. vulnerable human bodies... metal, concrete, fire, and high explosive.
our government carries out these kinds of attacks is of course in pakistan. in 2010 we saw what the obama administration was going to be like on this score. there was a u.s. drone strike in pakistan roughly every three days in 2010. 9 new america foundation tracks these things and their record shows it was an unprecedented spike in terms of how frequently we were killing people in pakistan using this particular method of killing people even though pakistan is supposedly not a war zone for us, at least not more than anywhere else in the world. interestingly, though, in 2013 it dropped off. in 2011 we launched from dropping drone strikes in pakistan roughly every three days to launching them on average every five days. then in 2012 it dropped off even further. we were launching a drone strike in pakistan about every seven or eight days as of 2012. well, how is this year shaping up? it is january 10th. so so far there have only been ten days in 2013. of those ten days in 2013 so far we have launched a drone strike in pakistan on seven out of those ten days. now, maybe that is an ab
much worse. >> those numbers keep rising. thank you. 7 charity workers were buried in pakistan today. they had been shot to death in a van on their way home from teaching girls and distributing vaccines. this is the latest in a string of attacks on people working in a polio vaccination scheme or educating girls. both activities are posed by the pakistani taliban. >> there has been no threats, no warnings of the barbarity that was to come here. this community center gave girls of the area and education and it is where parents brought their children for vaccinations. both are crimes in the eyes of the pakistani taliban who see them as serving a western agenda. the staff had just finished for the day and were heading home along this road when they were ambushed by militants. the 5 teachers were women in the early 20's and two health workers were traveling in this van. gunmen stopped them and camera decide and pulled open this door and then shot all 7 at close range. their handbags and notebooks are now bloodstained and is the line from the vehicle. 1 passenger did survive, a 4- year-old
think they should be deploying drones? >> we have used drones against al qaeda in pakistan, afghanistan, and other places in the world. i think it is incumbent on us in the senate to make sure we have a framework for when and how we're going to approve the use of drones. i do think they are an important tool in our toolkit to fight back against islamic extremists and to take action against folks who have demonstrated to be a real threat to the united states and our regional allies. >> thank you very much for joining us from capitol hill tonight. >> thank you. >> in other news now, senior officials say that leon panetta, the defense secretary, decided to lift a ban about women in combat. it will make available hundreds of thousands of jobs. women are part of the active military personnel in america. and a suicide bombing at a mosque at the capital of baghdad. explosives inside the mosque south of kirkuk. a funeral was taking place at the time of the attack. russia says it is not planning large-scale evacuation of its citizens from syria despite the crisis there. many were flown back to m
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 610 (some duplicates have been removed)